Archive for April 2014

University of Virginia researchers can predict violent crime via Twitter

Hidden in the Twittersphere are nuggets of information that could prove useful to crime fighters — even before a crime has been committed. Researchers at the University of Virginia demonstrated tweets could predict certain kinds of crimes if the correct analysis is applied.

A research paper published in the scientific journal Decision Support Systems last month said the analysis of geo-tagged tweets can be useful in predicting 19 to 25 kinds of crimes, especially for offenses such as stalking, thefts and certain kinds of assault.

The results are surprising, especially when one considers that people rarely tweet about crimes directly, said lead researcher Matthew Gerber of the university’s Predictive Technology Lab.

Gerber said even tweets that have no direct link to crimes may contain information about activities often associated with them.

Researchers use Twitter to predict crime (via AFP)

Hidden in the Twittersphere are nuggets of information that could prove useful to crime fighters — even before a crime has been committed. Researchers at the University of Virginia demonstrated tweets could predict certain kinds of crimes if the correct…


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Cyber Security Professionals continue to be in high demand

A recent Washington Post article reported that the D.C. region has more cyber job openings than any other area in the US. The requirement that candidates hold a CISSP certification was likely a factor in such a high percentage of jobs going unfilled, said the story. CISSP stands for Certified Information Systems Security Professional. In other words, organizations are not able to “fast-track anyone to being certification-ready” and thus aren’t able to fill positions.

Although the increased demand for the CISSP  — (ISC)2‘s flagship certification — is great news at one level, it misses a larger point. The shortage of certified security experts reflects, to a certain extent, a lack of understanding about the types of certifications professionals can earn, and the requirements associated with them. I would encourage the US government and every industry building its cyber workforce to take the time to fully understand the career path of cyber professionals — and to do so prior to assessing their personnel needs and publishing job opening requirements.

More available from Information Week by clicking here

Major bug called “Heartbleed” exposes Internet data

An encryption tool used by a large chunk of the Internet is flawed, potentially exposing reams of data meant to be hidden from prying eyes.

The newly discovered security bug nicknamed Heartbleed has exposed millions of usernames, passwords and reportedly credit card numbers — a major problem that hackers could have exploited during the more than two years it went undetected.

It’s unlike most of the breaches reported over the past few years, in which one Web site or another got hacked or let its guard down. The flaw this time is in code designed to keep servers secure — tens of thousands of servers on which data is stored for thousands of sites.

That’s why some experts were calling Heartbleed the worst bug yet, something that should worry everyone who frequents the Internet or does business on it.

More available from The Washington Post by clicking here:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/04/09/major-bug-called-heartbleed-exposes-data-across-the-internet/